Thursday, March 27, 2008

Every Decade Or So...

Okay, so I was checking out political cartoonist David Horsey. I love political cartoons. If done right, they give you a comedic snapshot of the political world at large. A few years back I tried my hand at political cartooning, for a small, black oriented newspaper, here in Texas. I enjoyed it too, but I had to give it up. Those bastards were paying me on CP time; and you know that crap wasn’t cool or appreciated.

Anyway, Mr. Horsey is a Pulitzer winning cartoonist. I love his brand of humor and the reality in his work. He’s is the man. However, like most white cartoonist, he rarely depicts black people in his work, unless he is talking about poverty, sports, AIDS, or whatever else he believes relates primarily to black folks. But, I ain’t mad at him. Most white folks don’t know much about how black folks get down. I’m just surprised at how often he gets it right.

Take this cartoon for instance. Bill Cosby in 1988, Michael Jordan in 1998 and now Obama in 2008. I took a look at it and thought, “Wow, is this true?” Is it? Is it true that every ten years America finds a non-threatening Negro to latch a hold to? Someone just black enough to push into the lime light and say, “Hey, here is a Blackie we don’t have to be afraid of!” A role model of sorts.

I’m not sure if it is true, but when put into black and white, like that, it sure did give me pause to think about it. Black people are doing great things every day. That is a reality. But it isn’t that often that you hear about the great things that black folks do. Why is that? I’ll tell you why. Because the hand that controls the media, rules the world; and like it or not, white folks control the media.

But that’s okay. I don’t want be the wheat bread to America’s hoagie sandwich. I’d much rather be the partially burnt, discarded piece of toast, left on the plate at breakfast. Personally I think white folks are getting a little too comfortable around us anyway. I kind of liked it when I got into an elevator full of white folks and they all scrunched up into the corners, in order to get away for me. It made me feel like gansta.

-One Man’s Opinion. Peace.

16 comments:

Ms Sula said...

Funny. And great analysis as well.

MsPuddin said...

great post.

When Boondocks first came out I thought I wouldn’t like it, but I watched a few episodes and for a cartoon it has a pretty strong message. And it’s funny.

Yeah my dad always gets mistaken for a basketball player or has the little old lady on the elevator grabbing her purse. But he would more than likely be one of the few black people out there that if white people got to know, he would be an OK kind of guy.

mountii said...

that message is true though

Thoughts of a Southern gal said...

Because the hand that controls the media, rules the world; and like it or not, white folks control the media.

So true. That's why they always find the most ghetto talking no teeth having black person to interview on the 10 o'clock news.

Ms Smack said...

Crowded elevators do suck, I can see the wisdom in your comment.

Great cartoonist, but yes, you raise an interesting question and we have similarities here with our Aboriginal population. We do have some spotlight on Aboriginal artists, authors, magistrates, but mostly the role models are sports related.

I'm really enjoying your blog posts. They make me think!

guerreiranigeriana said...

“Hey, here is a Blackie we don’t have to be afraid of!” -you should be beat for that line...i died laughing...i almost had to walk away...

...hmmmnnn...it does give pause to think...but that is probably even more sad that he could stop and make us think like that...of course there are more blacks doing good shit, especially if you look overseas!...i'm just glad that fool didn't try to post ole fuck boys jackson and sharpton...i would have been mad then...in fact, you should go through each year from 1988-2008 and highlight the 'negro' of the year...*look at me giving out assignments...don't mind me!*...

...nice post...

Desy said...

*shakin head at ms sula*- took my #1 man...lol

no honest oneman... how gansta can you really be...? I mean if that pic of your nephew is any indication, you've got no leg to stand on sweet...lol

woooow- i love gettin revelations like that... things that we overlook being addressed in such an entertaining way... none offensive too...go white boy (cause you know i don't bother remembering their names...lol

ps- saw last comment from last post... you a virgin?!?!?!? werrrd? where was i when that confession happened... i need to do some post scrolling...lol

Mizrepresent said...

lol@you feeling gangsta!

MP said...

LOL I agree with you... I thinking white people are getting way to comfortable and I realized it a few years ago when I bumped into this white lady accidentally and SHE didn't even apologize. That's when I knew times were changing!

Darius T. Williams said...

I see why he's such a great artist.

dejanae said...

lol@ the last paragraph

good post
whether u believe it or nt
it makes you stop and think

haha@ thoughts of a southern girl

Kholi said...

soooo ... i do agree that white folks are getting a lil too comfortable with us ... in a very "i'm black and trying to keep my blackness usually when white folks want us around they are trying to steal things like cultural concepts and identities" type way ...

however, I'm wondering ... even in the midst of knowing that we should be wary of all things that white folks take on with too much acceptance ... do we go into this with a certain skepticism like, Ohhh he's too easily accepted so he's safe and not black enough? Or do we accept Barack for what he is, just like Cosby and Jordan, and know that there has to be someone to get a foot in ... ad realistically, white folks and lettin every negro on the block in through the front door ... some of us are pettin' their maids on the head as we walk past them through the great foyer, some of us are being secretly snuck in the back doors, and some of us are breaking windows, throwing bombs, just tryin' to shake ish up for ourselves.

But I must say, there is all seriousness in subversion. But then something even more serious in knowing that it takes place at all levels.

mostly i'm just saying ... the revolution is exactly what it says it is, a motion of one's mind ... and really a continuous motion of the universe and the people therein. what? ohhh. there is no such thing as small change.

kholi.

Torrance Stephens bka All-Mi-T said...

im down to be the burt toast too

Don said...

lol @ it made me feel gangster.

I feel you. I don't too much like when white people push all up on my space, trying to get all friendly and ish.

I think there is great truth to the cartoon depiction. I too think the media chooses who they prefer as the "friendly, or less threatening negro."

Ms. Behaving said...

Maaaan...you ain't never lied. Oh and what up gangSTA??

LOL

Jonathan said...

I don't think that the cartoon represents white interest in black culture every ten years, that wouldn't make sense.

..Isn't it the same dude in the cartoon, ten years older each time? It shows a progression of the white masses (specifically Generation Ys) taking black culture more seriously (for which you can draw positive or negative conclusions).

The cartoon shows that in the 80s prominent blacks could be respected for comic entertainment, by the 90s, they could be sporting heroes to idolise, and by the 00s even taken seriously as political leaders.